30 January 2019 – 1 March 2019

A HOME AWAY FROM HOME: THE INDIA CLUB EXHIBITION (HOTEL STRAND CONTINENTAL, LONDON)

“A new National Trust exhibition opens in London, shining a light on the rich social history of one of the city’s most fascinating community spaces: The India Club. Founded shortly after Indian independence by Krishna Menon, President Nehru and Lady Mountbatten, the India Club is perhaps better known for its close links with the India League. Originally located at 41 Craven Street before moving to 143 Strand, the Club was established to ‘promote and further Indo-British friendship’ and quickly became a vibrant hub for a growing British South Asian community in London. With one of the earlier Indian restaurants in London, the India Club soon gained a reputation beyond the Asian community and became a hotspot for cosmopolitan Londoners. Virtually unchanged for over 50 years, the Club still acts as a vibrant hub for a range of Anglo-Indian organisations and an extended community of journalists, writers, artists, academics and students who regularly meet there. Based around a newly-formed archive of oral history interviews carried out by National Trust volunteers, this small audio-based exhibition will provide visitors with the opportunity to engage with the lives and stories of those who considered the Club a ‘home-away-from-home’ from the late 1950s to the present day…  The exhibition will be accompanied by a vibrant programme of supper clubs, artist talks, screenings and conversations. Collaborators include the Migration Museum, Chocolate Films, Comfort Food Stories, Migrateful, and artist collective Specular Assembly.”

Find out more here

Related Newspaper Article here

22 January 2019 – 16 February 2019

WELCOME TO THE UK (BUNKER THEATRE, LONDON)

“Directed by Sophie NL Besse. PSYCHEdelight and The Bunker present. THEY ARE BACK! You loved their satire of Calais Jungle. You thought their journey was finally over. They thought so too. Welcome to the UK! Come in Ladies and Gentlemen, take a seat! Hold on tight… It’s Borderline! Expect Humour, horror, live music and candy floss. PLEASE MIND THE GAP BETWEEN THE CONTINENT AND THE ISLAND. The Borderline company present the world premiere of their new show, Welcome to the UK. They will also be performing their first show, Borderline, twice a week alongside Welcome to the UK on Tuesdays and Saturdays, so you can see both shows in the same day! Borderline is a satire of Calais Jungle devised and performed by a mixed ensemble of refugee and European performers. It premiered in November 2016 at the Cockpit Theatre as part of the Voila! Festival and has been touring since nationally and internationally (Germany, Switzerland, Denmark and India). Welcome to the UK is is a brand-new story – set on this side of The Channel. About the company: Borderline: 13 Countries – 1 Family. A unique theatre ensemble shortlisted for the Community Integration Awards. It was created by PSYCHEdelight, a Theatre Company of Sanctuary led by Sophie NL Besse, a writer director and psychotherapist. Three years ago, they all embarked on an artistic and human adventure to raise awareness and change the negative narrative often associated with refugees. THIS SHOW IS THEIR VOICE. YOU CAN WATCH A DOCUMENTARY MADE BY THE GUARDIAN ABOUT BORDERLINE HERE. Note. For the creation of Welcome to the UK we worked alongside the Women for Refugee Women drama group, supporting refugee and asylum women performers who have joined the Borderline cast. They are doing incredible work and it seems very important for us to help them raise awareness around the trafficking of women to the UK.”

Find out more here

5, 6, & 7 February 2019

MIGRATIONS: HARBOUR EUROPE (ARCOLA THEATRE, LONDON)

“The three plays of Migrations: Harbour Europe are the result of a Europe-wide call we launched in 2018 in collaboration with LegalAliens Theatre and Migrant Dramaturgies Network. The aim was to find texts addressing the theme of migration in an original and non cliched manner, avoiding the pitfall, noted by Chimamanda Adichie of “falling for the single story, reducing complex human beings to a single narrative”. The plays will be presented at the Arcola Theatre, Studio 2 from 1.30pm on the 5th, 6th, 7th of February 2019, directed by Becka McFadden and performed by a multilingual international cast: Luiana Bonfim, Daiva Dominyka, Lara Parmiani, Stelios Trakas. Every reading will be followed by a Q&A/debate curated by Dr Szabolcs Musca (University of Lisbon/ New Tides Platform UK/ Migrant Dramaturgies Network).”

Find out more here

5 February 2019 – 2 March 2019

BLACK IS THE COLOUR OF MY VOICE (TRAFALGAR STUDIO, LONDON)

By Apphia Campbell; Directed ByArran Hawkins And Nate Jacobs; Starring Apphia Campbell. “Following sell-out seasons in Shanghai, New York, Edinburgh and in London at Wilton’s Music Hall, the Fringe First award winner Apphia Campbell brings her acclaimed play with music to Trafalgar Studios for four weeks only. Inspired by the life of Nina Simone, Black Is The Color Of My Voice follows a successful jazz singer and civil rights activist seeking redemption after the untimely death of her father. She reflects on the journey that took her from a young piano prodigy destined for a life in the service of the church, to a renowned jazz vocalist at the forefront of the Civil Rights Movement. On selected evenings, Apphia performs her cabaret Soul Sessions after Black Is The Color Of My Voice (separate ticket purchase required). More information about Soul Sessions can be found here.

Find out more here

7 February 2019

RACIAL INEQUALITY IN BRITAIN: THE MACPHERSON REPORT 20 YEARS ON (LSE, LONDON)

Hosted By The Department Of Sociology. How have legislative issues been addressed to remedy racial inequalities and what has been the impact on law, policing, socioeconomic inequalities, media, politics and education? Kalwant Bhopal (@KalwantBhopal) is a Professor of Education and Social Justice at the University of Birmingham. David Lammy (@DavidLammy) is the Labour Party politician MP for Tottenham. Clive James Nwonka (@CJNwonka) is Fellow in Film Studies in the Department of Sociology, LSE. Faiza Shaheen (@faizashaheen) is Director of the Centre for Labour and Social Studies. Coretta Phillips is Associate Professor in LSE Department of Social Policy. Established in 1904, the Department of Sociology @LSEsociology at LSE is committed to empirically rich, conceptually sophisticated, and socially and politically relevant research and scholarship. Building upon the traditions of the discipline, we play a key role in the development of the social sciences into the new intellectual areas, social problems, and ethical dilemmas that face our society today. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEMacpherson20

Find out more here

7 & 8 February 2019

DECOLONISATION: NOT JUST A BUZZWORD… (SOAS, LONDON)

“It’s a concept understood in diverse ways. At its heart it exposes contemporary racialised disadvantages and connects them to historical processes of colonialism. This headphone verbatim ‘work in progress’ show captures campus conversations about how SOAS is seeking to challenge its founding imperial purpose and deliver its vision to decolonise the education sector. Students on global campuses have ignited the demand to decolonise the physical space, the curriculum and institutional memory in a fight against intersectional oppression. Behind the sensational headlines, lie deeply personal and political lived experiences that go beyond the call to remove statues, repatriate artefacts and diversify reading lists. Verbatim theatre brings to the stage compelling stories into one conversation and invites us to listen deeply. Exploring themes that range from representation and reparation to reflexivity in pedagogy, voices from the SOAS community are striving for transformative action. But can the legacies and traumas of the past be addressed within the pillars of institutions? An insightful and timely examination of the threads that connect us and the urgent need to unravel them and come together. ‘They speak French because they’re French. We speak French because we’re colonised’ ‘When you give people history, You give them value. You’re saying, you matter. The world was constructed because you were in it and people like you’

Collaborating artists: Sudha Bhuchar, Suman Bhuchar, Neela Doležalová  & Kristine Landon-Smith. Performance Times: Thursday 7 February at 6pm (Priority given to SOAS community). Friday 8 February at 7pm.”

Find out more here

8 February 2019 – 8 April 2019

NELSON MANDELA: THE OFFICIAL EXHIBITION (26 LEAKE STREET, WATERLOO, LONDON)

“Revolutionary. Father. Political prisoner. World leader. Statesman. Icon of the struggle against oppression. Nelson Mandela was all of these things and more. Nelson Mandela: The Official Exhibition is the major new global touring exhibition that takes visitors on a personal journey through the life of the world’s most iconic freedom fighter and political leader. An immersive and interactive experience covering over 750 square metres, the exhibition features previously unseen film, photos and the display of over 150 historical artefacts and personal effects on loan from the Mandela family, museums and archives worldwide. This unprecedented exhibition provides fresh insight into the people, places and events that formed his character and the challenges he faced. Discover Nelson Mandela as you have never known him. Nelson Mandela: The Official Exhibition opens 8 February, 2019 at 26 Leake Street Gallery at Waterloo’s historic Leake Street Graffiti Tunnels – the perfect home for this one-of-a-kind exhibition. A portion of the exhibition proceeds will be given to the Mvezo Development Trust to support economic development programs in South Africa’s Eastern Cape.”

Find out more here

9 February 2019

EXPLORING BLACK MUSLIMS HISTORY AND HERITAGE IN BRITAIN AND BEYOND BY THE MUSLIM COUNCIL OF BRITAIN (SOAS, LONDON)

“The Muslim Council of Britain in collaboration with SOAS’s Centre for African Studies, the Centre for Islamic Middle Eastern Law, Everyday Muslims and Archive initiative and other participating partners invite you to a Symposium and Exhibition with the theme “Exploring Black Muslims’ History and Heritage in Britain and Beyond”. The aim of the Symposium is to discuss important issues around the way Black Muslims are perceived and treated both within the Muslim Communities itself as well as within British society more broadly, through an exploration of issues around the history, culture and heritage of Black Muslims in the UK and Beyond. The event will bring together academics, scholars, and stakeholders to discuss important topics around the theme of heritage and culture of the Black Muslims. Highlighting the important contributions of this segment of our communities as well as promote mutual understanding and respect for one another especially in this very difficult period of Brexit. It is particularly important to have this discussions in order to tackle the problems of Racism, Islamophobia and other forms of discrimination that seem to permeate the social membrane of the society in recent times. There will be an exhibition of some collections of the Everyday Muslims on the Black Muslims and other segments of the Muslim communities in their many years of work on documenting the Muslim Experience in the UK. The event will also feature performances such as spoken words, poetry, African fashion showcase among others. Organiser: Muslim Council for Britain, SOAS Centre of African Studies; and Everyday Muslims and Archive initiative.”

Find out more here

10 February 2019

CHINESE NEW YEAR (LONDON EVENTS): YEAR OF THE PIG!

“Join London’s Chinese New Year celebrations, the largest outside Asia, with colourful parades, performances and displays in and around Chinatown and London’s West End.”

Find out more here

Top 10 tips for Chinese New Year in London here

11 February 2019

ASIAN LGBTQ + SHORTS AT GOLDSMITHS UNIVERSITY (LONDON)

“As part of LGBTQ+ History Month, you are invited to Asian LGBTQ+ Shorts, which brings six diverse stories from India, Malaysia, Pakistan, Philippines and South Korea. As an emerging film genre, there has been a growing interest in LGBTQ-related stories from Asia. Today, LGBTQ+ filmmakers from Asia are telling their own stories to amplify their narratives in a raw and authentic way without a Western gaze.”

Find out more here or here

15 February 2019

“SOAS SOMALI DIASPORA CONFERENCE: CHALLENGES & OPPORTUNITIES IN UK” (SOAS, LONDON)

Organiser: Centre Of African Studies, Global Somali Diaspora And Anti-Tribalism Movement.“The Somali Diaspora is one of the largest black and ethnic minority communities in the UK. It is diverse and transnationally engaged but yet considered hard to reach by many public service providers and the wider public. Join us for a one-day conference that aims to dispel issues at the heart of this misperception. It brings together Somali community leaders and members, academics, practitioners and public service providers to unpack broad ranging topics such as social integration, youth and identity, employment, education, security, entrepreneurship, transnational activities, health and well-being. Speakers include: Government Officials, Mary Harper (African Editor, BBC), Cllr Dr Mohamed Hashi, Dr Idil Osman (SOAS), Dr Anna Lindley (SOAS), Issa Issa (CEO, Bright Education Centre), Onyekachi Wambu (Afford, CEO) Dr Muna Elmi (UCL), Dr Nur Hassan (North Kent College), Hanna Ali (PhD candidate, SOAS), Abdinasir Mohamed (PhD Candidate, Lancaster University), and many more.”

Find out more here

18 February 2019

INDIA AND THE MEDIA (SENATE HOUSE, LONDON)

“In the past five years, there have been over 200 attacks on journalists and bloggers across India, with the greatest number of cases in Uttar Pradesh, Bihar, Madhya Pradesh and Rajasthan. Three leading commentators on modern day India will discuss the sources and impact of multiple pressures from state and non-state actors on India’s once vibrant media. In the view of the Editors Guild of India, members of the BJP government and its extremist Hindu allies have “declared war. The panellists will discuss the implications of targeting print, broadcast and online outlets for the country’s forthcoming elections in spring 2019. Speakers: Professor James Manor, former Director of the ICWS; Salil Tripathi, Journalist and Chair, Writers in Prison, PEN International; Nupur Basu, Journalist; Chair: Mrs Rita Payne, Emetitus Chair, Commonwealth Journalists Association.”

Find out more here

19 February 2019

ROBIN DIANGELO: WHY IS IT SO HARD FOR WHITE PEOPLE TO TALK ABOUT RACISM? (WATERSTONES, BRISTOL)

“Anger. Fear. Guilt. Denial. Silence. Robin DiAngelo coined the term ‘white fragility’ in 2011 to describe the defensiveness that even the most well-meaning white people exhibit when their ideas about race and racism are challenged. In conversation with Madhu Krishnan, she talks about how we can start having more honest conversations, listen to each other better and react to feedback with grace and humility. It is not enough to simply hold abstract progressive views and condemn the obvious racists on social media. Change starts with us all at a practical, granular level. It is time for all white people to take responsibility for relinquishing their role in persistent racial inequality.”

Find out more here

19 February 2019

“THESE BLACKS HAVE ALWAYS BEEN LOYAL VASSALS OF MINE”: BLACKNESS, VECINDAD, AND RACE IN THE EARLY SPANISH AMERICAS (UCL, LONDON)

“Chloe Ireton , UCL. The paper explores how free black individuals and communities in the early Spanish empire successfully petitioned royal courts in Castile – sometimes traversing the Atlantic – in order to guarantee their rights as black Old Christian loyal royal vassals. The active, yet under-explored, role that some black communities played in negotiating the inclusion of blackness in definitions of vecindad (subjecthood / citizenship) by seeking royal aid to shape localized ideas about blackness, provides important insights into the relationship between black vecindad, royal vassalage, and religious lineage. The paper focuses on two successful petitions to the Castilian crown, one from late sixteenth-century Panama and another from early seventeenth-century Mexico City. These royal petitions highlight that far from there existing a unanimous and ubiquitous understanding of blackness and its relationship to notions of vecindad, that instead plural ideas about blackness and differing lived experiences coexisted across the early Hispanic empire. Ideas about the irredeemability of black blood circulated at the same time that free black men and women lived as vecinos, black royal vassals, and Old Christians across various sites of the empire. Importantly, while localized views on blackness differed across the Hispanic empire, black individuals and communities often played an important role in shaping notions of blackness and community in the early Castilian world through their daily practices and, sometimes, by appealing to higher authorities in the empire, namely, the crown in Castile. Monarchical intervention in both cases also highlights how ideas about blackness, vecindad, and royal vassalage varied across different sites of power within the empire, especially between the crown and local colonial authorities. The paper demonstrates that black communities often recognized that parallel and overlapping structures of imperial justice held differing views of blackness, and appealed to the crown as black loyal royal vassals when suffering injustices by local authorities.”

Find out more here

21 February 2019

SOLIDARITY ACROSS BORDERS – EVOLUTION OF STRUGGLE (SOAS, LONDON)

“Today’s generation of activists often hold up the anti-apartheid movement in the UK as an ideal example of how solidarity should function. It was organised and coordinated with direct reference to the ANC, with a clear view of the strategic role of the movement in the UK focused on UK institutional complicity with apartheid. However, the movement was often fraught with difficult questions about how best to support South African freedom fighters as well as internal struggles over issues of voice and representation. Social movements, and particularly when solidarity is evoked, are spaces where questions of identity and representation come to the fore. Social movements are vehicles for marginalised voices, however, they can also be tools through which existing hierarchies can also be invoked for the sake of “unity” and “the cause”. This session will explore these dynamics, with a specific focus on how issues of nationality, race, gender, and class were negotiated in movement politics. This event is open to the public but booking preference will go to students who register with university email and show ID at event.

Speakers:

Suresh Kamath joined the anti-apartheid movement as a student organiser. He was the vice chairman of the Anti-Apartheid Movement from the mid-1980s until 1994 and played a key role in organising the momentous Mandela tribute concerts at Wembley in 1988 and 1990.

Rafeef Ziadah is a Lecturer in Politics and International Studies at SOAS, focusing on the political economy of war and humanitarianism, racism and the security state. She is also a world-renowned poet and performer, and has worked on a number of campaigns on refugee rights.

Gargi Bhattacharyya is Professor of Sociology and co-director of the Centre for Migration, Refugees and Belonging at the University of East London. Her recent work includes Rethinking Racial Capitalism (Rowman and Littlefield, 2018) and Crisis, Austerity and Everyday life.

Nicholas Grant is a lecturer at the University of East Anglia. His research ehas focused on the history of the global anti-apartheid movement. His writing has appeared in the Radical History Review, Palimpsest: A Journal of Women, Gender and the Black International, and the Journal of American Studies. His first book, Winning Our Freedoms Together: African Americans and Apartheid, 1945-1960 was published in 2017 with UNC press. Follow him on Twitter @nicholasggrant.

Find out more here

23 February 2019

ANNUAL HUNTLEY CONFERENCE 2019: MORE THAN WORDS: 50 YEARS OF BOGLE-L’OUVERTURE PUBLISHING (LONDON METROPOLITAN ARCHIVES)

By Friends of the Huntley Archives at LMA. More than Words: 50 years of Bogle L’Ouverture Publishing: Celebrating half a century of writings, books, activism and community. Keynote address: Professor Carolyn Cooper, University of the West Indies, MONA, Jamaica. In its 50th year, the influence of Bogle L’Ouverture Publishing (BLP) continues to extend across the Diaspora. With the 14th annual Huntley conference, we pay tribute to its founders and esteemed contributors who will share their memories and talk about the significant treasures that are found in the archives. BLP was established as one of the first Black publishing companies with its first publication, the signature Groundings with my Brothers (1969) written by the renowned academic, activist and influential author, Dr. Walter Rodney. The BLP bookshop, one of the first in the UK was eventually renamed after Rodney was brutally assassinated in 1980 in Jamaica. Delivering the keynote address is Professor Carolyn Cooper, literary critic and cultural analyst, the author of two influential books on Jamaican popular culture, Sound Clash and Noises in the Blood; and the editor of Global Reggae.”

Find out more here

Until 23 February 2019

NINE NIGHT (TRAFALGAR STUDIO, LONDON)

By Natasha Gordon. Directed By Roy Alexander Weise. “Following a smash hit sold-out run at the National Theatre, Nine Night, Natasha Gordon’s ‘remarkable debut play’ (Evening Standard) transfers to the West End this December. Roy Alexander Weise directs this touching and exuberantly funny exploration of the rituals of family. Family, food, music and mourning. Gloria is gravely sick. When her time comes, the celebration begins; the traditional Jamaican Nine Night Wake. But for Gloria’s children and grandchildren, marking her death with a party that lasts over a week is a test. Nine rum-fuelled nights of music, food, storytelling and laughter – and an endless parade of mourners.”

Find out more here

26 February 2019

RESEARCHING BLACK QUEER ARTISTIC LIFE HISTORIES: BERTO PASUKA IN JAMAICA, BRITAIN AND FRANCE (PAUL MELLON CENTRE, LONDON)

Fellows Lunch by Gemma Romain. “This session explores some of my initial research findings on the art and life history of Berto Pasuka. Pasuka was a Black queer Jamaican dancer, choreographer, director, performer, writer, and painter. He moved to Britain in 1939 and his work in mid-twentieth century Britain, Jamaica and France focused on themes of Black diasporic history, colonialism and racism, and Black social, spiritual and cultural lives and identities. In 1946 he co-founded the Black ballet company Les Ballets Nègres, along with queer Jamaican dancer and artist Richie Riley. In 1953 after the disbandment of the company he moved to Paris, where he continued to perform and to work as an artist model. He also trained as a painter, in 1959 exhibiting at the 70th exhibition of the Société des artistes independents at the Grand Palais des Champs-Élysées. He then returned to London in 1960 where he exhibited twenty-eight pieces of his work in a solo exhibition in autumn 1960. Pasuka died in London in 1963. This research, carried out during a Paul Mellon Mid-Career Fellowship, will result in a biography of Pasuka, focusing on his artistic life as a Black queer man in mid-century Europe.”

Find out more here

Until 27 February 2019

THE WATER EFFECT (RICH MIX, LONDON)

Portraits of resilience from West Africa by Joey Lawrence and Guilhem Alandry in collaboration with WaterAid. “Today, 1 in 9 people around the world still don’t have clean water close to home, and in 3 have no toilet. Raising awareness of this crisis needs images with both impact and understanding. The Water Effect collects work by Joey Lawrence (Taylor Wessing 2018 Photographic Portrait Prize winner) and Guilhem Alandry, acclaimed photographers commissioned by the international charity WaterAid for two of their fundraising appeals. Lawrence’s series focuses on the people of Tombohuaun, a remote community in Sierra Leone who had no water, while Alandry’s series celebrates a troupe of travelling performers in Segou, Mali who promote good hygiene. Through community collaboration, the photographers show people’s lives in the global water crisis with respect and dignity. Interpreting classic West African photography, subjects are given space to take control of their image and introduce narrative through personal objects, while backdrops reference their unique locations and cultures – from banana leaves in Tombohuaun, to local cloth in Segou.”

Find out more here

28 February 2019

DIFFERENCE FESTIVAL – RADICAL CURATION: RACE, MEMORY AND ACTIVISM IN HERITAGE PRACTICE (UNIVERSITY OF WESTMINSTER, LONDON)

“Join us as we bring together activists, heritage professionals and academics developing new strategies to counter the naturalisation of racial injustice. This roundtable and Q&A examine the challenges of representing and commemorating black and minority histories. Together, we explore ways to bring marginalised pasts to public attention and make hidden histories visible. Followed by a drinks reception. Led by Lucy Bond, Lecturer in English Literature, School of Humanities and Jessica Rapson, Lecturer in Cultural and Creative Industries, King’s College London, with activists and heritage professionals from Tate, Museum of London, Black Cultural Archives, Black History Walks and the Organisation of Women of African and Asian Descent (OWAAD).”

Find out more here

Until 5 May 2019

DAVID ADJAYE: MAKING MEMORY (DESIGN MUSEUM, LONDON)

“How can a building shape our perception of events – and how can architecture, rather than words, be used to tell stories? Discover new monuments and memorials by celebrated British-Ghanaian architect, Sir David Adjaye OBE. Get a first peek at ongoing work and explore the influences behind the highly acclaimed Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture in Washington D.C. and more. Find out more about all seven projects here ‘The seven projects range from the grand and timeless to the tiny and temporary, the poetic to the bombastic’ The Times“

Find out more here

* * *

BLACK EUROPE RESOURCES

Sign up to receive Blogposts direct to your inbox by clicking Follow the Blog via Email

View old & new Events: https://blackeuroperesources.wordpress.com/category/events/

Access previous issues of the Black & Asian Heritage Mix Newsletter: https://blackeuroperesources.wordpress.com/category/black-asian-heritage-mix/

Follow Black Europe Resources on Twitter @Blackeresources

Visit the Website to read more: https://blackeuroperesources.wordpress.com/

* * *

Advertisements