Dear Followers,

Many of you are interested in learning more about the decolonising movement, so I have prepared an event list for you from different disciplines, so that we can see better together the interconnections and differences.

Cheers,

Thushari

Thushari Perera

BLACK EUROPE RESOURCES

 

ANGELA DAVIS IN CONVERSATION WITH JACKIE KAY

“On Tuesday 23rd April 2019, Decolonise Sociology hosted an historic meeting between novelist and poet Jackie Kay and civil rights activist Angela Davis at the Cambridge Corn Exchange. View on YouTube.”

Angela Davis

Image Credit via Decolonise Sociology@Cambridge

Find out more about Decolonise Sociology@Cambridge here

 

16 May 2019

DECOLONISING THE STUDY OF PALESTINE 71 YEARS AFTER THE NAKBA BY FOBZU AND UCU (INSTITUTE OF EDUCATION, LONDON)

Palestine“The Education, Occupation & Liberation programme marks Fobzu’s 40th anniversary and is co-hosted with the University and College Union (UCU). The series of lectures and seminars brings together Palestinian, UK and international scholars, students and practitioners to explore the challenges facing Palestinian education and its role in creating a free and flourishing Palestine. Speakers consider the struggle of Palestinian students and educators, approaches to liberation education and the contribution of Palestine to decolonising curricula in the UK. With Professor Abdel Razzaq Takriti, University of Houston and Chair: Professor Karma Nabulsi, University of Oxford.”

Find out more here

 

16 May 2019

SYMPOSIUM: DECOLONISING UNIVERSITIES (UNIVERSITY OF DUNDEE)

Global Code of ConductBy the School of Education and Social Work There is a burgeoning literature around decolonising university research and Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (SOTL) to challenge the dominance of Eurocentric norms in the legitimisation of knowledges, research methods and pedagogies (Ahmed, 2012; Applebaun, 2010; Bhambra et al, 2018; Campbell, 2014; Ferguson et al, 2019; Iveković; Manathunga, 2018; Santos, 2014). Although decolonisation, itself has been identified as an elusive and slippery category – meaning different things to different scholars and initiatives – from a metaphorical approach to one grounded in the lived experiences of students and academics shaped by legacies of the colonised global south; we are in agreement with Santos’(2014) litmus test that social justice must be connected with epistemic justice…”

Find out more here

 

16 May 2019

COMMUNITY OPEN MIC SESSION, DECOLONISATION? @ COMMON HOUSE IN EAST LONDON ON THURSDAY MAY 16TH, 6-9PM.

“The event is for local activists, artist and academics to meet and share their struggles. We will be joined by activists from SOUL – an Indigenous-led land action campaign in Aotearoa New Zealand) – to help us think through how decolonising efforts in the metropole might collaborate with those in (ex)-colonies. The venue is fully accessible, family is welcome and food/drink will be provided. Contact Person:

Rachel Jane Liebert, PhD, Lecturer, School of Psychology, Stratford Campus, Water Lane, University of East London, London E15 4LZ, Tel. 00442082234107, r.liebert@uel.ac.uk, http://uel.academia.edu/racheljaneliebert

 

17 May 2019

BLACK HUMANITIES AND DECOLONISING THE UNIVERSITY (OLD COUNCIL CHAMBER, WILLS MEMORIAL, BRISTOL)

“The student-consumer is supposed to be “king”—but is this University listening to Bristol Decolonising the Universitystudents’ complaints about its colonial curriculum? In this hostile environment, how might we draw upon Caribbean Philosophy, to help us build, on our colonial campus, the research-based teaching in Black Humanities that we want, in order—if, indeed, this is even possible—to Decolonise the University of Bristol?

Join Professor Neil Roberts, President of the Caribbean Philosophical Association, to participate in an action-oriented critical conversation that builds on Bristol’s membership of Universities Studying Slavery, that responds to Bristol’s City Conversations, which have concluded with the demand for “a Bristol Curriculum to tell Bristol’s history and the histories of Black people within and beyond it truthfully and without bias”, and that looks forward towards a future in which our curriculum empowers us to be, and to live, free.”

Find out more here

 

6 June 2019

THE PROBLEM OF MODERNITY: REINTERPRETING DECOLONISATION AND THE MODERN? (LSE, OLD THEATRE, OLD BUILDING)

Amit Chaudhuri Books“Hosted by the Ralph Miliband Programme: How might the modern, rather than the human, be recovered as a way of looking at a common inheritance? And why is modernity resistant to being recovered?

Amit Chaudhuri (@AmitChaudhuri) is an essayist, literary critic and the author of seven novels. Robin Archer is the Director of the Ralph Miliband Programme, LSE.

The Ralph Miliband Programme (@RMilibandLSE) is one of LSE’s most prestigious lecture series and seeks to advance Ralph Miliband’s spirit of free social inquiry.

Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEChaudhuri”

Find out more here

 

10 June 2019

SCOLMA ANNUAL CONFERENCE 2019 – DECOLONISING AFRICAN STUDIES: QUESTIONS AND DILEMMAS FOR LIBRARIES, ARCHIVES AND COLLECTIONS (UNIVERSITY OF EDINBURGH)

SCOLMA

Programme

“9.00 Introductions

9.05–10.20 Panel 1 – Decolonising library collections

10.45–12.15 Panel 2 – Decolonisation and archives in Southern Africa

13.30–15.00 Panel 3 – Archival histories and migrations

15.30–17.00 Panel 4 – Working with heritage collections

17.00–18.00 Round table – The round table will provide an opportunity to discuss some of the issues raised during the conference in relation to the collections of major libraries and archives in the UK and internationally. This programme is subject to change.

Conference fee £50 (£30 unwaged) to include tea/coffee and lunch. To book a place contact Sarah Rhodes (sarah.rhodes@bodleian.ox.ac.uk).”

Find out more here

 

14 June 2019

THE UNIVERSITY & RADICAL CHANGE: A CONVERSATION WITH RAEWYN CONNELL (HOPKINSON LECTURE THEATRE, NEW MUSEUM SITE, CAMBRIDGE)

RAEWYN CONNELL

“At this event, Raewyn will discuss the shape and sources of our problems in higher education, local and global; the resources (some unexpected) that we have for dealing with them; and post-colonial, democratic pathways into a different future. Please spread the word and join the conversation!”

Find out more here

 

4 – 5 July 2019

ARCHIVES AND EMBODIMENT CONFERENCE (CENTRAL SAINT MARTINS, LONDON)

“10am to 5.30pm – Full Price £65 | Student Rate £35 (with a valid NUS card) [there are a limited number of free UAL Staff places] Tickets sold as a 2-day event, not individually. Refreshments and lunch will be provided. This conference will explore the multiple and diverse practices through which the concept of the archive is animated and embodied. Building on examples of performance, re-enactment and replication, artists, writers and curators will debate the extended meanings of the archive in both contemporary and historical settings. Over two days of performances, talks and panel discussions the conference will explore the political and cultural context of ownership; categorisations of value and meaning in relation to key archives; and question who they are for, as well as how can they be understood by wider and more diverse audiences.
UAL Archives and Embodiment Conference

PROGRAMME [A full programme will be published on this page in May]

Participants at the conference include many internationally renowned academics, curators and artists from UAL and beyond. External speakers include:  Rebecca Schneider, Professor of Theatre Arts and Performance Studies at Brown University | Simone Osthoff, Professor of Art and Critical Studies at Pennsylvania State University | Dr Joanne Anderson, Lecturer in Art History at The Warburg Institute | Amanda Dunsmore, Artist and Lecturer, Limerick Institute of Technology |Melanie Keen, Director of Iniva (Institute of International Visual Arts) | June Givanni, Film Curator of the Pan African Cinema Archive | James Stevens, founder member of SPC, MayDay Rooms |Oliver Chanarin of Broomberg & Chanarin, Artists and Professors of Photography. There will also be a viewing of a film made by Professor Jane Collins and Dr Jo Melvin plus a live performance by John Seth. Introduced by UAL’s Dean of Research, Professor Oriana Baddeley and Pat Christie, Director of Library and Student Support Services”

Find out more here

 

CALL FOR PAPERS

 

CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS – DISCUSSION SERIES: DECOLONIZING FORCED MIGRATION RESEARCH

ESPMI Network

Part of the ESPMI Network’s Knowledge Cluster Project on Methodological Challenges in Forced Migration Research.

The ESPMI Network would like to invite you to participate as a discussant on the upcoming Discussion Series edition on Decolonizing Forced Migration Research. As a discussion participant, you will receive a central discussion question and be asked to provide a 300-400 word response. Your statement, along with fellow discussants, will be collected and posted on the ESPMI website and shared through the Network’s social media channels.

What is the Discussion Series?

The Discussion Series brings together international voices, including new and established scholars, practitioners, researchers, and advocates, to discuss topics of concern in the field of forced migration and refugee studies. Modelled after the New York Times ‘Room for Debate’ discussion series, the series provides a platform to share ideas and perspectives on leading migration-related issues. We aim to bring together a mix of new and established scholars, practitioners, researchers, and advocates passionate about refugee issues to contribute to a well-rounded discussion.

DISCUSSION QUESTION:

What is the contribution of decolonial debates to the study of forced migration? How do these debates inform our methodological approach? What do we understand by decolonial research methods on forced migration? This debate is inspired by the discussion of decolonising the university more broadly, but also some recent calls to humanising refugee research.

Please provide:

Short Biography (50 words max)

Good quality photo

Discussion statement (300-400 words)

Your personal and professional experiences are invaluable to the broader dialogue on forced migration in relation to the thematic topic area. We look forward to hearing your perspective and hope that you will provide rich descriptions and examples in your answers. Please submit your statement, short bio, and a photo via email to espminetwork@gmail.com by June 1, 2019.

Find out more here

 

CFP: DECOLONISING POLITICAL CONCEPTS CONFERENCE

DECOLONISING POLITICAL CONCEPTS CONFERENCE“Thursday 19th – Friday 20th September 2019

Hosted by the Centre for Citizenship, Civil Society and Rule of Law (CISRUL), University of Aberdeen

Deadline for abstracts submission: 6th June 2019

Invited Key Speakers: Julie Cupples (University of Edinburgh), Oscar Guardiola-Rivera (Birkbeck University), Salman Sayyid (University of Leeds)

Topic

Postcolonial and decolonial thinkers and activists have spent the last decades unravelling the intellectual, political and structural legacies of colonialism and ongoing coloniality in our contemporary world. Political concepts are part of these legacies. The way academics define and use them is generally mediated by traditions of political thought marked by and even framed by coloniality. However, and despite the increasing and far-reaching work of postcolonial and decolonial research, this aspect of political concepts is still too often silenced or ignored in some academic settings. As a Centre for Citizenship, Civil Society and Rule of Law and a PhD programme focused on political concepts, we feel the need to bring these debates to our research and thinking. We aim to engage not only with the Centre’s core concepts but also with projects dealing with, but not exclusively, sovereignty, secularism or democracy. We particularly invite intersectional critiques and perspectives on political concepts and decolonial theories related to these.

We call for papers on the coloniality of political concepts, and on how ontological, epistemological and political closures and exclusions are reproduced through their use. Papers engaging more explicitly with assumed and reproduced political and epistemological hierarchies resulting from an uncritical engagement with Western political concepts are also welcome. Lastly, we seek to open up collective and collaborative reflections on how to expose, challenge and overcome the colonialities still permeating ideas and research by questioning the tools that political concepts are. We aim to engage with non-Western and indigenous political thought and experiences, inviting prospective speakers to reflect on alternative uses and on what decolonised political concepts might look like. We see such dialogues as necessary in order to find ways of living together that acknowledge and respect plurality and allow for genuinely “postcolonial” academic and political contexts.

Format

The conference will be held at the beautiful Old Aberdeen campus of the University of Aberdeen on Thursday 19th and Friday 20th September.

Confirmed speakers include:

Julie Cupples is Professor of Human Geography and Cultural Studies at the University of Edinburgh, and specializes in cultural geography, development studies and media and cultural studies. Her recent publications include Unsettling Eurocentrism in the Westernized University (2018), co-edited with Ramón Grosfoguel.

Oscar Guardiola-Rivera is Professor in Law at Birkbeck University of London. His work spans theory and history of human rights, constitutionalism, international law and globalisation. Among many other publications, he is the writer of the award-winning What If Latin America Ruled the World? (2010).

Salman Sayyid is Professor of Social Theory & Decolonial Thought at the University of Leeds. His extensive and interdisciplinary work might be place under the umbrella of Critical Muslim Studies. His books include Islamism as Philosophy: Decolonial Horizons(2017).”

Find out more here

 

The listings included here are provided only for information, not necessarily endorsement. Please let me know if any links are broken.

 

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